Ethical Sourcing

If your diamond ring could make a difference half a world away, would you choose more carefully?

Ethical Sourcing

The issue of conflict diamonds, or ‘blood diamonds’, has deservedly received a lot of attention in recent years. As we have all become more conscious consumers, many of us have come to insist on ethical products like Fairtrade coffee, cruelty-free cosmetics, organic produce and so on. The question of just where our luxury items are coming from has also become more pressing. In certain parts of the world, some diamond producers and traders are known to have been involved in illegal or immoral practises, including human rights abuses, labour violations and using the proceeds of diamond sales to fund civil conflicts. While only a small minority of diamonds have ever been ‘blood diamonds’, it is obviously unacceptable for any diamond to be mined or traded in a way that causes suffering. Conflict diamonds present a major ethical issue, and one we feel needs to be tackled head-on.

The Diamond Shop takes its social responsibilities seriously. That’s why we investigate, and aim to be completely transparent about, the origins of all our diamonds. Unlike a lot of main street jewellers, we’ve been doing so for a long time. As far back as the early 1980s, CEO Win Charlebois was invited to act as an industry consultant to the New Zealand government as they debated what would eventually become the Kimberly Treaty, one of the first serious steps by the diamond industry to create a formal ethical framework. The Kimberly Treaty is effective, but not perfect, which is why we are also proud to be the first jeweller in New Zealand to sign the new Rapaport Pledge for Ethical Jewelry. This means we have publically committed to only sell ethically sourced stones. We investigate the provenance of all our diamonds, and refuse to sell any we know or suspect might have been involved in unethical activity.

The Diamond Shop undertake regular audits of our diamond suppliers to ensure they are living up to our ethical requirements, and refuse to trade with companies that don’t abide by these rules.

Diamond Origins

Our Supplier Nations

Australia

Mining is a major industry in Australia, and mine workers enjoy high salaries and safe working conditions. Environmental regulations are strong, and there are no human rights concerns related to any of Australia’s diamond mines.

Canada

Diamond mining contributes to many regional economies in Canada, providing fair and safe employment for locals. Canadian mines are also required to comply with strict environmental regulations.

Botswana

Botswana is a model supplier when it comes to putting diamond revenues to good use. Mining contributes heavily to Botswana’s growing economy, and a government initiative using diamond profits has made free schooling available to all children up to 13. Mines in the Kalahari Desert are subject to regular environmental monitoring to protect its eco-system.

Russia

Russian diamond mines provide tens of thousands of well-paid jobs, along with housing, healthcare and pensions for workers. Incentives like these attract workers from all over Russia to the mines, and the industry directly funds public works projects.

Namibia

Diamond mining and cutting are both thriving industries in Namibia, a developing nation where diamonds count for 30% of annual export revenue. Namibia’s rich diamond resources have helped create much-needed skilled jobs, healthcare programs and infrastructure.

Blacklisted Nations Include

Zimbabwe

The Diamond Shop currently does not purchase any diamonds mined in Zimbabwe, due to recent reports of human rights violations at the Marange diamond mines.

Diamond Shapes

Read More

The 4C’s of Diamonds

Read More

Tax Free Engagement Rings

Read More